Wednesday, September 5, 2012
stayinbedgrowyourhair:

it’s true, watching women talk to other women about how shitty we’ve been treated is something to be mocked and dismissed
let’s get back to men talking to men about men things

Growing up I never thought that in 2012, I’d have to be fighting for my rights to be a free-thinking, independent woman. But it seems as though a lot of politicians are afraid that women are still too weak, fragile and emotional to make big decisions.
Even if we were any of those things, shouldn’t they be helping us to grow and be better and stronger — as they have done for their male counterparts?
The truth is, we’re none of those things. Women might be different from men, but it doesn’t make us any less capable of independence. Our strength often comes from our emotions — and so does our drive to become better, smarter and equal partners in everything we do.

stayinbedgrowyourhair:

it’s true, watching women talk to other women about how shitty we’ve been treated is something to be mocked and dismissed

let’s get back to men talking to men about men things

Growing up I never thought that in 2012, I’d have to be fighting for my rights to be a free-thinking, independent woman. But it seems as though a lot of politicians are afraid that women are still too weak, fragile and emotional to make big decisions.

Even if we were any of those things, shouldn’t they be helping us to grow and be better and stronger — as they have done for their male counterparts?

The truth is, we’re none of those things. Women might be different from men, but it doesn’t make us any less capable of independence. Our strength often comes from our emotions — and so does our drive to become better, smarter and equal partners in everything we do.

I was sleeping in my room, I had the blankets over my head and they came and pulled the blanket off. They were like ‘wake up’. My sister was sleeping next to me - we were so scared. My heart was beating so fast. There’s a bunch of strangers in my living room, I didn’t know what was going on. I didn’t know if I was being robbed. But when they turned around we saw their FBI jackets with guns. I’ve never seen a gun that close before and I was scared.

They told me to put my hands behind my back. I don’t remember if they read me my rights because I was so dazed out. I felt like I was walking towards a death sentence …. But still I didn’t know what was going on.

I spent my 17th birthday in jail. It was the worst birthday I could ever have.

Adama Bah

A teenager was terrorized, threatened, & arrested as she slept in her home. She was targeted for this treatment entirely due to her religion.

We have a problem in this country and we need to fix it.

(via freemasonic-yowl)

Some days it seems as though both political parties are so hardened in their views that they’ve forgotten to stop and look at what they’re doing to Americans. Politics should be used to bring people together and solve problems. Today, our government is using politics to tear us apart.

Monday, August 27, 2012
talkshows:

TWO WEEKS BEFORE CONCEPTION MEANS ALL THE TIME

I have no words to explain my anger and can’t really put together a whole sentence on this right now. Angry bullets, it is.
Fuck you Arizona. Take a science class.
THIS IS NOT PHYSICALLY POSSIBLE.
Fuck you, Kimberly Yee.
Fuck you Jan Brewer.
FUCK EVERYONE WHO VOTED FOR THIS.
Are you fucking kidding me?!?!
When did we go back to 1872?
Have they now proven immaculate conception to be true?
Another way men can claim women have cheated on them!
Another way women can be dishonest to their partners (no double standards here)!
What the fuck kind of country am I living in?!?!
What do other countries think of us right now? 
Do you realize how stupid this sounds? 
A virgin can now be pregnant BEFORE having sex! 
What. the. fuck.
And that has been a list of just a few of the comments running through my head.
Thanks, Arizona. You just made the entire country look like a bunch of assfucks.

talkshows:

TWO WEEKS BEFORE CONCEPTION MEANS ALL THE TIME

I have no words to explain my anger and can’t really put together a whole sentence on this right now. Angry bullets, it is.

  • Fuck you Arizona. Take a science class.
  • THIS IS NOT PHYSICALLY POSSIBLE.
  • Fuck you, Kimberly Yee.
  • Fuck you Jan Brewer.
  • FUCK EVERYONE WHO VOTED FOR THIS.
  • Are you fucking kidding me?!?!
  • When did we go back to 1872?
  • Have they now proven immaculate conception to be true?
  • Another way men can claim women have cheated on them!
  • Another way women can be dishonest to their partners (no double standards here)!
  • What the fuck kind of country am I living in?!?!
  • What do other countries think of us right now?
  • Do you realize how stupid this sounds?
  • A virgin can now be pregnant BEFORE having sex!
  • What. the. fuck.

And that has been a list of just a few of the comments running through my head.

Thanks, Arizona. You just made the entire country look like a bunch of assfucks.

(Source: jotarokujo)

Thursday, August 23, 2012
sarahlee310:

sarahlee310:

The Guttmacher Institute today released a nationally representative study, the first of its kind, finding that most women seeking abortions had experienced at least one “disruptive event” in the year prior to their abortion. Such “social shocks,” as study author Ann Moore called them, include moving multiple times, being unemployed, separating from a partner, falling behind on rent or a mortgage or having a partner incarcerated, among others. Physical or sexual abuse is another kind of “disruptive event,” one that seven percent of women obtaining abortions reported. “Women with abusive partners are substantially over-represented among abortion patients,” the study concluded. Perhaps surprising to some, more than half of the women surveyed reported using a contraceptive method in the month before they become pregnant.
The study comes as a needed reality check after Missouri Republican Senate candidate Todd Akin’s ridiculous remarks about the likelihood of pregnancy after “legitimate rape.” As this study and others suggest, rape and sexual coercion play a role in a significant number of pregnancies. The link found in the Guttmacher study between intimate partner violence and unintended pregnancy in particular calls out for further examination, said Moore. “There are direct ways that violent partners, and nonviolent partners, can interfere with a women’s ability to prevent unintended pregnancy. There’s also a relation between the instability that comes with being in a violent relationship.” Two years ago, Lynn Harris reported on a crop of studies that identified a phenomenon researchers called “reproductive coercion” among teens in abusive relationships, “in which abusive partners subject young women already at risk of violence to the additional health risks of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.” Birth control sabotage also showed up in the Guttmacher study released today, with six respondents of forty-nine saying their partners had undermined their efforts to prevent pregnancy, for example by tampering with contraceptives. Researcher Elizabeth Miller has called for more study into whether “pregnancy ambivalence”—the term researchers use to describe sexually active women who don’t want to get pregnant but aren’t trying to prevent it—is really “male-partner influence on women’s reproductive health and autonomy.”
Akin’s comments have provoked a number of thoughtful responses about how often women are obligated to justify their rapes, abortions and other personal, private life events. Whether a rape victim appears “legitimate” can often determine whether the rape is prosecuted, and whether the jury convicts the defendant. Whether a woman seeking an abortion is doing so for a “legitimate” reason—her health is in danger, or the pregnancy was the result of rape or incest—can determine whether she can legally or practically access the abortion at all.
Drawing attention to women who experience reproductive coercion or seek an abortion as a result of a rape might, on the surface, suggest that we’re trying to find an “excuse” for an abortion—a “legitimate” reason—that, might, just might, placate conservatives. As Maya Dusenbery wrote on Feministing, “You don’t know anything about other people’s lives. The point is to show that we can’t categorize abortions into these different types, because every single woman’s reason for getting an abortion is absolutely unique” (emphasis in the original).
(via Does It Matter Why Women Have Abortions? | The Nation)

Yep  - I reblogged myself because I think this is important and I originally posted it pretty late at night.

Read This. The whole thing.

sarahlee310:

sarahlee310:

The Guttmacher Institute today released a nationally representative study, the first of its kind, finding that most women seeking abortions had experienced at least one “disruptive event” in the year prior to their abortion. Such “social shocks,” as study author Ann Moore called them, include moving multiple times, being unemployed, separating from a partner, falling behind on rent or a mortgage or having a partner incarcerated, among others. Physical or sexual abuse is another kind of “disruptive event,” one that seven percent of women obtaining abortions reported. “Women with abusive partners are substantially over-represented among abortion patients,” the study concluded. Perhaps surprising to some, more than half of the women surveyed reported using a contraceptive method in the month before they become pregnant.

The study comes as a needed reality check after Missouri Republican Senate candidate Todd Akin’s ridiculous remarks about the likelihood of pregnancy after “legitimate rape.” As this study and others suggest, rape and sexual coercion play a role in a significant number of pregnancies. The link found in the Guttmacher study between intimate partner violence and unintended pregnancy in particular calls out for further examination, said Moore. “There are direct ways that violent partners, and nonviolent partners, can interfere with a women’s ability to prevent unintended pregnancy. There’s also a relation between the instability that comes with being in a violent relationship.” Two years ago, Lynn Harris reported on a crop of studies that identified a phenomenon researchers called “reproductive coercion” among teens in abusive relationships, “in which abusive partners subject young women already at risk of violence to the additional health risks of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections.” Birth control sabotage also showed up in the Guttmacher study released today, with six respondents of forty-nine saying their partners had undermined their efforts to prevent pregnancy, for example by tampering with contraceptives. Researcher Elizabeth Miller has called for more study into whether “pregnancy ambivalence”—the term researchers use to describe sexually active women who don’t want to get pregnant but aren’t trying to prevent it—is really “male-partner influence on women’s reproductive health and autonomy.”

Akin’s comments have provoked a number of thoughtful responses about how often women are obligated to justify their rapes, abortions and other personal, private life events. Whether a rape victim appears “legitimate” can often determine whether the rape is prosecuted, and whether the jury convicts the defendant. Whether a woman seeking an abortion is doing so for a “legitimate” reason—her health is in danger, or the pregnancy was the result of rape or incest—can determine whether she can legally or practically access the abortion at all.

Drawing attention to women who experience reproductive coercion or seek an abortion as a result of a rape might, on the surface, suggest that we’re trying to find an “excuse” for an abortion—a “legitimate” reason—that, might, just might, placate conservatives. As Maya Dusenbery wrote on Feministing, “You don’t know anything about other people’s lives. The point is to show that we can’t categorize abortions into these different types, because every single woman’s reason for getting an abortion is absolutely unique” (emphasis in the original).

(via Does It Matter Why Women Have Abortions? | The Nation)

Yep  - I reblogged myself because I think this is important and I originally posted it pretty late at night.

Read This. The whole thing.

Wednesday, August 22, 2012

Sir, Please Explain Your Position.

When it comes to the politics of the GOP, I just don’t understand. They seem to have an intense hatred of anything different, anything that doesn’t invoke memories of ‘Leave it to Beaver’ and their glory days of the past.

Their policies are harshly bigoted against women, the elderly, minorities and the poor. And I just don’t understand why.

Why do they hate us so much? Why do they want to take away my rights? Why are they trying to make it harder for people to vote? To get quality health care?

Republicans, can you please explain to me the basis for your positions? I want to respect you as leaders of our country, but at this point all I feel is an intense hatred for your hate. Why do you have such a sense of entitlement? Why can’t you see that you’re sending us backwards in time? Where are you going with my freedoms?

What happened to the Constitution? Did you forget about the part where it grants us all the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness? Where women and minorities got voting rights? Where we were given the right to choose?

This isn’t just about rape and abortion. This is about our rights as free citizens of the United States of America.

think-progress:

Todd Akin is NOT the exception to GOP views on women. 

The GOP doesn’t care about women’s rights, and this is just one of the ways they show it.

think-progress:

Todd Akin is NOT the exception to GOP views on women. 

The GOP doesn’t care about women’s rights, and this is just one of the ways they show it.